Search Icon
Claremont Courier Logo

Readers comments: April 15, 2022

Response to “The train has left the station,” (COURIER, April 8, 2022)
Dear editor:
In response to a recent letter to the editor, there is one topic that needs updating: the restroom access in the Claremont Lewis Museum of Art. These restrooms have been available without a museum admission fee since 2018. When we first opened in 2016, there were a series of unfortunate issues and dangerous activities in the restrooms which resulted in our limiting access to museum visitors. Working with the city and the Claremont Police Department leadership, we were able to change that policy four years ago.
The Claremont Depot is on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the most iconic buildings in our city. With widespread community encouragement and the generous financial support of hundreds of members, donors, and friends, including Metro bond funding, the interior of the Depot has been seismically retrofitted, restored, and renovated into gallery spaces to showcase Claremont’s rich artistic legacy and the remarkable talents of current artists.
In addition, CLMA’s arts education program, Project ARTstART, celebrating 11 years in the local elementary schools, and reaching over 2,000 students each year, is supported by the Los Angeles County Arts and Culture Department, the Claremont Kiwanis Club, the Claremont Rotary, the Fine Arts Foundation, and the Ruth Reed Foundation.
We invite the entire community to visit your museum and join us on May 21 when we open the new gallery spaces and exhibit pieces from our permanent collection, many never seen before. Thanks to an extremely generous and strategic endowment gift and some current funds from Randall Lewis to provide more access, the museum is now open with free admission every Friday. We hope and expect that CLMA’s expansion and free day provides more accessibility to the vibrant arts culture in our community and also enhances Claremont’s reputation as a destination for a broad range of visitors.
Elaine Turner
CLMA Board President

In response to Ms. Jenny Ballesteros of Claremont Little League, (COURIER, April 8, 2022)
Dear editor:
It was my mistake to assume that Claremont Little League uses Padua Sports Parks; I used the term “Little League” generically, clueless that there is more than one youth baseball league in our community. I know full well the number of volunteers and number of hours it takes to get the fields ready for play and keep things organized all season. That knowledge added to my confusion when I noticed the way in which the park was left after weekend games. I hope the league responsible will “come clean”.
Pamela Hawkes
Claremont

Protecting democracy
Dear editor:
According to recent polling, 84% of voters—Republicans and Democrats alike—agree that no president, regardless of party, should be able to obstruct and undermine the will of the American people or exploit weaknesses in our political system for their personal gain. In our polarized politics, that bipartisan support is a huge deal.
So what can we do to protect our democracy from presidential corruption? Pass bold legislation like the Protecting Our Democracy Act. If passed, it would prevent future abuse of presidential power and corruption, increase transparency, and ensure presidents of either party can be held accountable.
If the average person used their public office for personal gain, they’d go to jail. So why should the president be allowed to act with impunity?
That’s why I’m urging Congress to pass the Protecting Our Democracy Act. We must prevent future presidents of any party from abusing the power of their office.
John Maher
Claremont

Rhino Records and Video Paradiso
Dear editor:
The intentional and systematic marketing of the Claremont Village as a destination and the effects of the resulting gentrification are bearing their rotten fruit: we are saying goodbye to (another) iconic place that makes Claremont “Claremont”. Thank God the Harpers were able to purchase the Folk Music Center building years ago. And what will replace these lost businesses, these lost community gathering places? Overpriced restaurants, hair salons, another boutique? Just what we need. It doesn’t matter what they are, as long as they can pay the jacked up rent in coveted downtown Claremont.
It seems apt to quote from one of the first albums I bought in 1983 at Rhino Records: Cyndi Lauper’s She’s so Unusual. The song is “Money Changes Everything”.
Gina Ortiz
Claremont

Looking at immersion education
Dear editor:
Few programs broaden cultural and linguistic diversity more than a dual-immersion education. An immersion education has long been assumed to provide general academic, social, and cognitive benefits. As part of a community that is currently developing and implementing dual-immersion curriculum into local schools, I urge parents to consider both sides of this education program. Whether these stated benefits outweigh potential drawbacks is a question yet to be addressed.
Having participated in a Spanish dual immersion program in elementary school, I can say their lack of academic focus is an overlooked concern. Taking any remotely Hispanic holiday to host a separate event or assembly, the program prioritized cultural activities that interfered with our own learning experience. Though enjoyable in theory, these occasions became a nightmare as teachers would force students to spend hours creating or rehearsing out-of-tune songs, fragmented dances, and chaotic skits.
When academic content was taught, target-language content often caused learning challenges. Those struggling with Spanish now also battled understanding the concept itself. Such students had to work harder to understand the content in the rest of their courses and are at risk of more easily falling behind their peers.
All educational pathways implemented must, in my opinion, be able to recognize their own shortcomings. In order to make properly educated decisions, I urge parents to question the intricacies of a dual-immersion education.
Bet-sua Perez Marcial
Claremont

Politics for personal gain
Dear editor:
Republicans and Democrats should be able to agree that no president, regardless of party, should be able to obstruct and undermine the will of the American people or exploit weaknesses in our political system for personal gain.
That’s where the Protecting Our Democracy Act comes in. If passed, it would prevent future abuse of presidential power and corruption, increase transparency, and ensure presidents of either party can be held accountable.
Strengthening the guardrails on presidential power is just common sense. If the average person used their office for personal gain, they’d go to jail. If the average person could pardon themselves, there would be no rule of law.
No president should be above the law. That’s why I’m urging Congress to pass the Protecting Our Democracy Act. We must prevent future presidents of any party from abusing the power of their office.
Nova Thompson
Pomona