Profiles

Ken Gonzales-Day, 58 and Scripps College’s Fletcher Jones Chair in Art, is currently balancing two spotlights, one shining from the Claremont Lewis Museum of Art and the other from The Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, where the art and photography professor is being double featured.

Internationally acclaimed poet and essayist Roger Reeves, 43, said he’s not really feeling like a celebrity this week despite Claremont Graduate University rolling out the red carpet for him. Don’t get him wrong though, he’s still enjoying the star treatment as an honored guest of the college, complete with a welcome ceremony Monday.

On Sunday, December 3, Walter’s Restaurant owners the Ghafarshad family will host a celebration of their 50 years of advancing the gastronomy, art, culture, and community of Claremont.

Eduardo Acevedo recently entered his second week as the new principal at Sumner Danbury Elementary School in charge of Danbury programs. Courier photo/Andrew Alonzo

When Kendall Johnson got a phone call from the Chancellor’s office of New York City’s Department of Education just before 7 a.m. on September 11, 2001, he didn’t yet know the twin towers had been hit. But that’s exactly why the head of student services was reaching out. “We don’t know what to do,” she said, describing the huge plume of smoke she could see over lower Manhattan while telling him to turn on his TV.

When Carmen Flores and Tatiana Guerrero learned the City of Claremont aimed to name the couple its 2023 honored group and wanted them to be part of next week’s Fourth of July parade, their first reaction was puzzlement.

On the Fourth of July, Indian Hill Boulevard will be center stage for Claremont’s celebration of American independence. Look for Courier columnist John Neiuber leading the pack as the parade’s grand marshal.

Claremont resident Raul Rodriguez is the city’s 2023 honored citizen and will be celebrated as he makes his way through the Fourth of July parade route, which begins at Memorial Park at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

Like many good things in life, Sara Sawyer’s “yoga in the garden” class was born out of necessity.

What is it about music, particularly the songs we heard when we were young, that gives it the power to remind us so vividly of time, place, emotion? Tom Waldman, playwright, television host, and author, taps into this question in his highly entertaining new personal, historical, and political musical memoir, “Countdown: A Life in 20 Songs.”