Readers comments 10-5-18

The Claremont continuum

Dear Editor:

As we draw closer to Claremont’s city council election on November 6, it is my hope that you had an opportunity to get to familiarize yourself with the candidates and their platforms.

Our city is fortunate to have a strong selection of Claremonters that are well-qualified and want the best for our city. Our city will continue to be a stellar example of model civics and community involvement. Our capable staff, many of whom are new in their leadership roles as well, will be led by a new council majority which our voters will elect.

My decision not to seek re-election assures the opportunity for a new set of leaders to take advantage of new ideas, fresh outlooks and different approaches. However, it is important that the continuum that has defined our city remains constant and could withstand the city challenges, while continuing to maintain our core values and ideals. Which is why, after meeting with several of the candidates, I endorse candidates Jed Leano, Ed Reece and Jennifer Stark. These are the candidates that I believe will best maintain everything we love best about our community, while addressing the many challenges ahead.

With Jed’s legal acumen, Ed’s business knowledge and Jennifer’s sound community sense, they are a well-rounded team. Please visit their websites, or talk to them in person, to assess for yourself.

I strongly believe that their teamwork will bring a strong work ethic and fresh thoughts to help our community tackle the unfinished business that has evaded our current council.

While I am proud of the accomplishments of the council that I served on, I am prouder that our community has a strong legacy of leaders that continue to make Claremont a better place. It is that same sense of commitment to our community that I see in Jed, Ed and Jennifer. These are the leaders that move forward the Claremont continuum.

Sam Pedroza

Claremont

 

With heartfelt thanks

Dear Editor:

On September 25, the Claremont Homeless Advocacy Program (CHAP) celebrated its fifth anniversary of continuous support for homeless adult individuals within our community at the historic Garner House. Guided by CHAP’s strategic plan the event was coordinated by members of this grassroots, all volunteer organization.

The volunteers and participants of CHAP sincerely thank the staff of the Garner House, whose hospitality and graciousness made the breakfast event, held on their beautiful patio, possible.

We are grateful to executive director David Shearer, office manager Kristen Fass and public relations coordinator Logan Nigh for their generous efforts in making the event a successful one.

We also thank the friends of CHAP, members of the Claremont City Council, and Claremont city officials who joined us at the event to celebrate the history of the organization, its continued work within the community, and the success of CHAP’s program participants.

We are grateful to live in a community whose care and concern for others is evident.

Amy Duncan

on behalf of CHAP

 

The farce of the committee

Dear Editor:

I am writing this letter in advance of the committee vote to advance the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for Senate confirmation to the lifetime appointment to the United States Supreme Court.

I am a lawyer who is in private practice.  I have been a lawyer for nearly 40 years with a practice devoted to criminal defense matters.

The Senate Judiciary Committee totally abrogated its responsibility to conduct a fair, complete and impartial hearing on Judge Kavanaugh’s qualifications for the appointment.

This proceeding was a “job interview.” Any doubt as to the total qualifications of the nominee must always be resolved in favor of protecting the integrity of the institution. For example, I was a police officer prior to my admission to the bar. As such, I performed (in addition to my other duties) background investigations regarding applicants for employment. The rule was, “If there is any doubt about the qualifications of the applicant, that doubt must be resolved in favor of the department.”

As to Judge Kavanaugh there was substantial doubt. Thus, to avoid the controversy he should have withdrawn his name from consideration.

The Canons of Judicial Ethics state, “ A judge shall uphold and promote independence, integrity, and impartiality of the judiciary, and shall avoid impropriety and the appearance of impropriety. A judge shall perform the duties of judicial office impartially, competently, and diligently.”

Simply stated, if there is an appearance of an impropriety, real or not, a judicial officer is required to recuse himself or herself.

Time and space do not permit me to expound on the stench that surrounded the hearings, the consideration of non responsive answers, the lack of a complete investigation, which could have corroborated Dr. Ford’s compelling testimony, or in the alternative exonerated Judge Kavanaugh, left a unresolved cloud of suspicion.

If I had been asked to defend a client in a criminal trial based on the facts alleged by Dr. Ford I would be looking for a hat from which to pull out the rabbit.

Stuart A. Holmes

Claremont

 

The character of a nation

Dear Editor:

Jacqueline Mahoney (COURIER, September 28) seems to have completely missed the point in Merrill Ring’s letter of September 21.

Self-identifying as a “deplorable,” she believes Mr. Ring should be “educated about government” and goes on to threaten civil war “like no other” if either impeachment or the 25th amendment should be used—which, in my mind, is deplorable.

Mr. Ring’s comments are not about Donald Trump’s achievements in the economy or on immigration. Instead they are about his behavior and his apparent lack of understanding about the character of American government.

Mr. Trump declared that treason has been committed in a New York Times op-ed critical of himself. Treason, in fact, is an act against one’s country and not, as Mr. Trump seems to think, against its presently elected leader. The US is not an absolute monarchy, though Mr. Trump seems totally confused about that point.

As for immigration, Ms. Mahoney seems to think that Democrats are completely responsible for blocking any progress on immigration issues. I just hope she can look into the long-term history of immigration issues in our country.

I came to California in 1957 and began voting in this state in 1958. So far as I can remember the big farming companies in California and their Republican friends have done everything possible to keep immigrant workers flowing across our borders to offer cheap labor on farms. And, worse than that, many farmers hire immigrant laborers for the day and then call Border Patrol before they have to pay up. What a deal, free labor! Mexico is not paying for Trump’s wall and neither should we.

And then there is the economy. It’s not that Mr. Trump has actually done much for it; it’s really just that corporate America has gone crazy believing the world ahead is one without restrictions in which they can do anything they want. Sure, dump that industrial waste in the rivers. Start burning coal again. Replenish the methane and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and see how warm we can really pump this planet up.

The stock market and your 401k are not the whole of the economy. The “economy” is about how we live and that includes what we do to the environment in which we live and what we do to one another.

The Trump economy favors those with extreme wealth against all the rest of us. Is that really an accomplishment we should be proud of?

Tad Beckman

Claremont

 

The Claremont continuum

Dear Editor:

As we draw closer to Claremont’s city council election on November 6, it is my hope that you had an opportunity to get to familiarize yourself with the candidates and their platforms.

Our city is fortunate to have a strong selection of Claremonters that are well-qualified and want the best for our city. Our city will continue to be a stellar example of model civics and community involvement. Our capable staff, many of whom are new in their leadership roles as well, will be led by a new council majority which our voters will elect.

My decision not to seek re-election assures the opportunity for a new set of leaders to take advantage of new ideas, fresh outlooks and different approaches. However, it is important that the continuum that has defined our city remains constant and could withstand the city challenges, while continuing to maintain our core values and ideals. Which is why, after meeting with several of the candidates, I endorse candidates Jed Leano, Ed Reece and Jennifer Stark. These are the candidates that I believe will best maintain everything we love best about our community, while addressing the many challenges ahead.

With Jed’s legal acumen, Ed’s business knowledge and Jennifer’s sound community sense, they are a well-rounded team. Please visit their websites, or talk to them in person, to assess for yourself.

I strongly believe that their teamwork will bring a strong work ethic and fresh thoughts to help our community tackle the unfinished business that has evaded our current council.

While I am proud of the accomplishments of the council that I served on, I am prouder that our community has a strong legacy of leaders that continue to make Claremont a better place. It is that same sense of commitment to our community that I see in Jed, Ed and Jennifer. These are the leaders that move forward the Claremont continuum.

Sam Pedroza

Claremont

 

Ed Reece for Claremont

Dear Editor:

Claremont is a desirable community in part because of our engaged citizens. For several decades, Ed Reece has been one of those engaged citizens. His volunteer efforts in a diverse variety of community organizations are a testament to his dedication to all Claremont residents.

He is currently serving as chair of the police commission for the fourth consecutive year. He is the founder and chair of the Claremont Crime Prevention Coalition and co-chaired the Yes on SC: Partners for a Safe Claremont campaign. Clearly Ed is interested in keeping residents, visitors and businesses safe.

Ed is chair-elect of the Claremont Chamber of Commerce, an indication of his commitment to Claremont businesses. Ed serves as a member of the Claremont After School Program development committee, an indication of his commitment to Claremont youth. He is a member of the Sustainable Claremont finance committee and liaison to the city’s Committee on Human Relations.

As president of the Inland Valley Repertory Theatre (IVRT) board of directors, Ed is doing his part to ensure cultural enrichment for residents and area-wide audience members.

Being an engaged citizen is a part of who Ed is. He understands, appreciates and accepts his civic responsibility and will continue to do so as a member of the city council. Join us in voting for Ed Reece for Claremont City Council.

Butch Henderson

Sonja Stump

Betty Crocker

Claremont

 

 

 

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